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The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Participant: To start, if a participant was to remember or put into practice only one idea from your [online conference] session, what would that one key takeaway be?
Lisa Audet: I think the most important message is one of “inclusion.” That is, when working with individuals who are high-functioning, we need to think of abilities and how they might contribute. I have learned that many of our degree-seeking students are so done with being considered disabled when they come to college that they reject assistance.
16.12.2017 at 05:24 pmLike
The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Learn practical, holistic strategies to address the unique communication and emotional needs of adolescents by taking part in our exciting online conference. Earn up to 3.0 ASHA CEUs. http://on.asha.org/2ABgc1FThe American Speech-Language-Hearing Association added a new photo.16.12.2017 at 03:14 pmLike
The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association So who is Generation Z? What happened to the millennials, born between 1980 and 1995, who were group-oriented and collaborative? Born in 1996 and after, here comes Gen Z—moving into our university classrooms and soon to be members of our workforce. In some ways, they are very different from millennials!
The children of Gen-Xers, Gen-Zers are realistic, tech-oriented, very competitive, individualistic and highly driven. They are more private and often prefer to work alone.
Gen Z is intensely practical, and wants the bottom line immediately: How is course information relevant? With limited patience for theory and research that seem unrelated to the working world, Gen Z needs to see the practical side of my lecture material immediately. As Gen Z students have started to enroll in my undergraduate classes, I have found some tactics that are helpful for student engagement and learning.
15.12.2017 at 02:54 pmLike
The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association A flowing and engaging conversation is great when it works, but painful when it doesn't. And when it never works it can be lonely, too. ASHA member and assistant professor at Utah State University Stephanie Borrie was recently featured on Tedx Talks about the importance of entrainment and how the shortage of it in patients with conditions such as Parkinson's Disease can affect quality of life and health outcomes.15.12.2017 at 10:39 amLike
The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Big changes might be in store for how much students can borrow in the form of federal loans and what options they may have to pay them back. Check out this blog post to learn more about what the proposed PROSPER Act could mean for higher education.14.12.2017 at 06:46 pmLike
The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Throwback Thursday! Ten years ago in 2007, ASHA staff members moved into the new National Office at 2200 Research Boulevard in Rockville! The move is remembered by many who are still here and today the office houses 288 employees! We're so happy to call this building home!The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association added 2 new photos.14.12.2017 at 09:03 amLike
The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Human interaction is crucial to a child's language development but could a robot designed to help babies who are deaf get the extra practice needed accomplish the same thing? Is this a good thing? ASHA's Director, Clinical Issues in Speech-Language Pathology weighs in, "“It's not the tablet itself, it's not the computer itself or the TV itself, it's the way it's used,” she says. “We actually want families, caregivers to be reading to their children, speaking to their children, signing, singing. We want that social interaction because it's within that context that you learn speech and language or signing skills.” Read on for more.13.12.2017 at 06:07 pmLike
The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Our biology is tightly regulated by a network of internal physiological clocks, some of which turn on and off critical developmental windows or control other long-range biological events associated with aging.
The conventional wisdom has been that these biological timekeepers, like time itself, move only forward—and that once biological events are set into motion, these events cannot be reversed, stopped or even slowed.
But what if we could turn back the hands of time, re-open critical windows of neural plasticity and slow down biological clocks to keep cognitive and sensory systems younger for longer? In the case of hearing decline, what if we could return to the ears of our youth?
Musical training just might be what our ears need to turn back that clock
13.12.2017 at 02:53 pmLike
The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association added 2 new photos.13.12.2017 at 01:29 pmLike
The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Call for posters is now open for ASHA’s 2018 Connect conferences (July 20–22, 2018, in Baltimore, MD)! Submit yours today for a chance to showcase your work in the field during a poster session! Bringing Schools Connect, Health Care Connect, and Private Practice Connect under one roof, ASHA’s 2018 Connect conferences are the go-to events for speech-language pathologists. Attend a Connect conference to enhance your skills and get practical tools you can apply right away to better serve your students, patients, or clients. For more information, visit http://on.asha.org/2AdPWdG.The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association added a new photo.12.12.2017 at 08:20 pmLike
The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Ever wonder what would possibly happen if you met face-to-face with your representatives in Congress? What would you say? What would they say? Would they understand your position? Would they really know what a speech-language pathologist or audiologist does? You might be surprised. Check out what happened to ASHA member John Tetnowski when he met with Rep. Clay Higgins (R-Louisiana) to discuss legislative issues affecting the professions.12.12.2017 at 05:05 pmLike
The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Bringing ASHA’s Schools Connect, Health Care Connect, and Private Practice Connect under one roof, ASHA’s 2018 Connect conferences are the go-to events for speech-language pathologists. Attend these conferences to enhance your skills and get practical tools you can apply right away to better serve your students, patients, or clients.The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association added an event.12.12.2017 at 02:02 pmLike
The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Research Tuesday! This study investigates false belief (FB) understanding in children who are hard of hearing (CHH) compared with children with normal hearing (CNH) at ages 5 and 6 years and in second grade. Research with this population has theoretical significance, given that the early auditory–linguistic experiences of CHH are less restricted compared with children who are deaf but not as complete as those of CNH. Participants included CHH and CNH who had completed FB tasks as part of a larger multi-center, longitudinal study on outcomes of children with mild-to-severe hearing loss. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal data were analyzed. At age 5 years, CHH demonstrated significant delays in FB understanding relative to CNH. Both hearing status and spoken-language abilities contributed to FB performance in 5-year-olds. A subgroup of CHH showed protracted delays at 6 years, suggesting that some CHH are at risk for longer term delays in FB understanding. By second grade, performance on first- and second-order FBs did not differ between CHH and CNH. Authors concluded that preschool-age CHH are at risk for delays in understanding others' beliefs, which has consequences for their social interactions and pragmatic communication. Research related to FB in children with hearing loss can potentially inform our understanding of mechanisms that support social–cognitive development, including the roles of language and conversational access.12.12.2017 at 11:05 amLike
The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association For months, she had put up with her co-workers’ eye-rolling when she spoke. Their snide—and loud—comments about her occasional mistakes on documentation. Their nasty jokes about her abilities.
But finally Sue*, a speech-language pathologist, had had enough. So she called the employee hotline at the urban academic medical center where she works and lodged a complaint that these three junior co-workers were bullying her.
The hotline’s very existence points to the frequency of bullying: Close to a third of the U.S. workforce experiences it, according to the Workplace Bullying Institute (WBI). And bullying and uncivil behavior among employees can hurt workplace functioning: Victims report high levels of mental disorders like depression and physical disorders like high blood pressure, according to WBI.
11.12.2017 at 05:42 pmLike
The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Learn about four distinct stages in the cognitive rehabilitation process and six specific treatment approaches with our new streaming video course, Beyond Workbooks: Functional Cognitive Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injuries. Earn 0.4 ASHA CEUs. http://on.asha.org/2nJEip9The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association added a new photo.11.12.2017 at 01:35 pmLike
The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association What started out as a class assignment is now a viral video of fourth-grader George Yionoulis explaining to his classmates what it is like to have autism. "I have fun dancing, I have fun making music, I love to draw and make art and, wait for it ... I have this thing called autism," he explains in the video. "I'm a kid, just like you."11.12.2017 at 11:48 amLike
The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association I have known my best friend Ann since high school. I am not sure exactly when or where we met but she would remember. We were “the Anns” throughout high school, and we were always together. We remained friends after high school. I became a speech-language pathologist and she became an accountant. We were each other’s maid of honor and we watched each other’s kids grow up. We were there for each other when our moms aged and passed away.
We stopped talking for a short period. I don’t remember why, but she would. Ann was always the talkative one. She could talk to anyone about anything and never allow a lull in a conversation. She was always organizing trips to New York to see a play or a concert or getting us together in her backyard. She made sure I (the now single one) was included whenever she could. She remembered birthdays and anniversaries and was always there with food when someone lost a loved one. Ann would always say, “I saw so-and-so from high school! Remember them?” I didn’t, but she did. She was my memory.
In June 2017, I got a text from her husband: “Ann had a brain aneurysm. She is going have surgery tomorrow.” I was terrified. I knew what that could mean because I had seen the results so many times before. I frantically sought out more information and learned that the situation was not great. But there was hope that she would make it.
10.12.2017 at 08:35 pmLike
The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association The more children are engaged in reading and writing activities at home, the greater their reading and writing achievements in school, indicates a five-year longitudinal study of 241 families. Also, parental ratings of children’s ability to self-regulate attention spans remained stable for the study duration, while executive functions, such as goal-setting, tended to improve in all students.09.12.2017 at 05:36 pmLike
The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Check it out! We have a new Practice Portal page on Adult Dysarthria! For more information and to see all the resources, visit http://on.asha.org/2j42KzV.The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association added a new photo.09.12.2017 at 10:59 amLike
The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Have you ever been in another country and not spoken the language? How frustrated and vulnerable did you feel when you couldn’t communicate your basic wants and needs, much less more complex messages? This is the experience of our intubated patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) every day.
Communication remains a challenge for intubated patients. ICU staff may not know about or be trained in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and communication strategies, or they may have limited access to appropriate materials. They may not ask speech-language pathology for an evaluation of communication needs. And even though nurses play an essential role in establishing communication with patients, studies show that nurses often report feeling unprepared to effectively communicate with patients with complex communication needs (see sources).
08.12.2017 at 04:39 pmLike